The Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR): Performance Indicators to Evaluate Foodborne Disease Surveillance and Control Programs

 

Speakers:         Donald J. Sharp, MD, DTM&H, Associate Director of the Food Safety Office, CDC, GA

                        Brian Collins, MS, REHS, DAAS, Director of Health, City of Plano, TX

 

The Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR) is composed of representatives of public health and food regulatory agencies at federal, state and local levels.  CIFOR seeks to improve the effectiveness of foodborne disease surveillance and control activities across the public health system. 

 

The purpose of this project was to develop measurable indicators of effective surveillance for enteric foodborne diseases and for response to outbreaks of such diseases on the part of state and local public health officials.  These indicators are intended to be used by state and local public health agencies to evaluate the performance of their foodborne disease surveillance and control programs.  Specific indicators and sub-indicators have been identified to support the overall objectives of the foodborne disease surveillance program.  Metrics have been developed to standardize the evaluation of the indicators.  The use of standardized performance criteria and metrics serves several functions.  They will promote a common understanding of the key elements of foodborne disease surveillance and control activities across local, state, and federal public health agencies; they will facilitate training of food program staff in the use and interpretation of the performance criteria; and they will allow for the aggregation of data at state, regional, or national levels to evaluate program effectiveness and identify specific needs for improvement and additional resource investment.

 

This session will present an overview of the development process, introduce the indicators, and solicit feedback on the indicators and the most effective way to promote their use among local health agencies.